You READ – but do you leave REVIEWS? – by Chris Graham (aka The Story Reading Ape)

This post has been shared from the blog of Chris Graham please check out his wonderful blogsite: Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog


The subject of posting reviews for books that you enjoy, or even those you do not, has been a topic of great interest for writers, undoubtedly since the first book was written. Reviews are pirceless for authors and they affect the standings on Amazon and other book selling sites, and are greatly appreciated.


This article sums it up nicely. Thank you so much, for sharing, Chris, and spreading the word about the importance of reviews.




If not, why not?

I don’t have time


The author probably spent a heck of a lot more time writing the story than you took to read it, no matter how slow you think you are, so why not take a few minutes to record your feelings about it.


I can’t write long fancy reviews like those I see on book review blogs


You don’t have to, Amazon, for example, only ask you to use a minimum of 25 non repeating words.


I can’t express myself very well


No-one is asking you to produce a literary masterpiece, start off with things you liked, didn’t like or a mix of both about the book, e.g.,


I liked this book because –


it reminded me of –


it made me think about –


it made me so scared I couldn’t sleep for –


it made me feel homesick for –


it made me more aware about –

etc.


and just express your feelings about it


take a look at MY reviews – no lengthy literalistic tomes, no divulging the story endings or highlights (these are called spoilers), you’ll find them on Amazon and my Goodreads page.


But all the other reviews are great long one’s. Everybody will laugh at mine


Let them laugh, you won’t be there to see them. Anyway, if they laugh AT you instead of WITH you, it demonstrates what kind of people THEY are.


In any case, an author will not laugh AT you I can assure you. They can see the difference between an honest comment and one that is professionally presented.


Honest reviews tell them an awful lot more and they pay more attention to them.





But what if I really, REALLY HATED the story.


As long as it was the story and not the author, then instead of posting a review comment, you can contact the author directly by email (usually found on their websites) and tell them why you really, REALLY hated the story.


If it was the AUTHOR you didn’t like, my advice is to keep it to yourself and avoid their books in future. Both of you will lead happier lives for it.


I can’t write to an author, they’re all too big and far above my status


You’d be surprised, authors come in all shapes, sizes and stations in life. The only difference between them and you is that they wrote a story and actually published it.


Why do authors need reviews anyway? They can write whatever they want and besides, they all make a lot of money so they don’t need ME doing reviews.


Only partly true.


Authors write whatever story is inside them that they feel needs to be told.


However, not all authors are rolling in money, if it were that easy YOU’d be an author yourself wouldn’t you?


Authors are storytellers


Storytellers NEED an audience


YOU are part of that audience


They cannot SEE how you react to the story


They cannot see your tears, hear your laughter or feel your emotions in response to the story they are telling – it is not like they are on a stage in a live show.


THAT is why they need your review comments, they need you to tell them about your reactions, so they can work on improving the existing and future stories they are writing, thereby improving your enjoyment of them.


So, if I leave review comments about a story I’ve read, I’ll be helping them get better at telling them?

Yes!


MMMM but I don’t have time –


Please refer to the top of the page and read it as many times as necessary until the message finally gets through – thank you!





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